Precious Gemstones

Loose Gemstones:

Specials Product:
CODE: D001

Diamond Rough
0.3 - 1.5 carat
USD $ 190/Crt
Detail report
CODE: Z001

Emerald Rough
1.5 - 10 carat
USD $ 40/Crt
Detail report
CODE: R001

Ruby Rough
1.5 - 10 carat
USD $ 40/Crt
Detail report
CODE: S001

Sapphire Rough
1.5 - 10 carat
USD $ 40/Crt
Detail report
CODE: Y001

Yellow Sapphire Rough
1.5 - 10 carat
USD $ 40/Crt
Detail report
CODE:  C001

Cat Eyes Rough
1.5 - 10 carat
USD $ 30/Crt
Detail report

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Precious Gemstones

Only three colored gemstones are considered precious. These are the emerald, sapphire and ruby, which have retained their prized positions among jewels due to their extraordinary colors and extreme rarity. Precious gemstones with good color and large size are very hard to come by. Because of their rarity, it is common to use stones with inclusions and blemishes in jewelry.

The precious gemstones - sapphire, ruby, and emerald - are among the most prized. Precious gemstones of good size and quality are so rare that a natural, unenhanced, strongly colored stone can be worth as much per carat, or more, than a diamond of comparable quality.

There are many other common types of treatment to enhance the beauty of colored gemstones. Emeralds are often oiled and waxed to protect them and to hide fine lines that naturally occur in the stone. Some sapphires have their blue color enhanced using diffusion, a chemical process. Certain stones are treated with radiation, again mimicking the processes of nature. All these practices are standard in the jewelry industry; in fact, enhancement is so common that good quality unenhanced stones often come with a certificate stating that fact.

Another misconception is that the list of four precious gems has a long history. In fact the traditional list of precious gemstones is rather longer and includes some surprising members. Pearl, though not strictly speaking a gemstone, was considered to be precious; so was opal. But one of the most traditional precious stones with a history going back to ancient Greece was amethyst.

Of all the precious stones, diamond is the most subject to myth. But it is interesting that the myths are of modern rather than ancient origin. Historically, colored gemstones such as ruby and sapphire were more highly valued than diamond, mainly because diamond was not particularly rare. But the twentieth century saw a major change. The first thing that happened is that very large finds in South Africa created an even more abundant supply of gem quality diamond. At the same time, the perceived value of diamond has risen to the point where it’s fair to say that diamond is at the top of the list of the precious stones in the mind of the buying public. What happened? Aren’t precious gems valued especially for their rarity?
Rare Red Spinel

In the 19th century, world production of diamond was only a few pounds a year. After the discovery of the huge South African diamond mines in 1870, diamonds were being dug out of the ground literally by the ton. There was such a glut of supply and so little demand that the British financiers of the South African mines were in danger of losing their investment. Their solution was to create the powerful De Beers cartel that to this day controls worldwide diamond production and supply. Quality diamonds are actually not scarce at all. But De Beers controls how much supply comes on the market and that keeps prices high.

The De Beers consortium also mounted a concerted decades-long advertising campaign to associate diamonds with love, courtship and marriage, under the now familiar slogan “Diamonds are Forever.” The diamond engagement ring, once unknown in most parts of the world (including Europe), is now considered an essential part of the ritual of marriage. It is hard to avoid the conclusion that diamond’s special position as a precious stone is due largely to monopoly economics and social engineering.

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